FREE SHIPPING FOR ORDERS OVER $100 IN CANADA or $125 IN THE US.

CR10-V3 – All Metal Upgrade + CR Touch





Transcript

Hello everybody and welcome to another video tutorial. Today we’ll be upgrading the machine to use an all metal hot end thanks to a couple of mods that I designed myself as well as installing the new CR Touch which is crealities BLTouch alternative. Full disclaimer, this is not a paid sponsorship, I was sent the CR Touch free of charge for testing purposes and the opinions that you will see here are my own. Furthermore, undertake this at your own risk, and I’m in no way responsible if damages may occur as a result.

Before starting to design anything, I first needed to see how the hot end was mounted to the machine. So this meant dissembling the unit and seeing which portions could be reused and which one needed to be changed. For the components that I’m building today, I did find it easier to do the test prints with PLA, so long as I monitored the temperatures. I then used my SLA printer to print with engineering materials.

I went with the E3D V6 direct kit since even with the exchange rates it came to almost the same amount as a knockoff and I knew the quality that I was getting. Another benefit was the online resources that they provided to the user. They had diagrams which included important measurements and even had the steps for modifying the firmware. So I knew I was going to have the proper thermistor settings enabled without having to do additional research.

With all of this information, I began designing the adapter for the hot end itself. Now in the stock version, the main cooling fan was attached to an outer case which made nozzle changes more difficult because of the lack of access. So I knew ahead of time that I would need to keep this area as clear as possible. What I ended up modelling was an adapter which fit into the stock gear section of the filament feed and used a Zip tie to help ensure that it remained in place. Although the zip tie wasn’t necessary, it was an additional precaution to make sure that everything held together.

While the finished part was printing on the machine, I began making the changes to the firmware. I changed the thermistor type to number 5 which was the 100k thermistor -ATC Semitec 104GT-2. With that portion changed, it was now time to set the maximum Temperatures for the hot end. Because this was a higher temperature hot end, it was important to take into account how the firmware worked. For safety reason, the firmware automatically reduces the max temperature reading by 15 degrees on the LCD screen. So to fully tighten the nozzle, we’ll first have to increase the max temperature by this amount and lower it back down. With this hot end, the maximum temperature is 285 degrees Celsius. So if you do this, you’ll want to make sure that you turn back down the maximum to 285 degrees after properly tightening the nozzle. I made a previous video showing how to do nozzle changes on this machine, which I’ll include a link in the description below.

By this point I had already decided that I would mount the cooling fan to the same screws as the CR Touch, therefore I modelled and began testing this portion together as soon as possible. With the mount for the CR Touch, there’s a little of play involved, therefore it’s important to keep this in mind when installing your part. In my first design I created only one cooling fan however the parts weren’t cooling properly in overhanging areas, so I redesigned this to a secondary output that ran onto the other side of the nozzle and although the designs don’t necessarily match they do however allow for minimal material use and a more streamlined path for the air to flow.

At this point, I began installing the finalized parts that I had 3d printed and replacing the BLTouch with the CR Touch. One thing I noticed was that in my case, I had to use trial and error to manually set the Z-Offset for the machine. To do this, I’m going to level the bed by going to “Prepare” + “Bed Levelling”. Afterwards, I went to “Prepare” + “Move Axis” and lowered the nozzle to the zero mark. Next, I went to “Control” + “Motion” + “Z-Offset” and began tweaking the value until I got a perfect first layer. Just make sure to save your settings otherwise it won’t be stored, so go back one menu after setting the Z-offset and choose “Store Settings”. This meant quite a few failed test prints, but was the best solution I found given the issues I encountered. For some reason, the nozzle would hit the bed whenever I used the proper method of calibration. The only difference was that I had compiled by own version of the firmware by using the source code which had been provided by Creality. In future, I would like to see them update this source code to reflect the changes which may have occurred as well as updating Marlin to one of it’s more recent releases. Other than that, I didn’t have any problems with the CR Touch, so I’m hoping that they’ve addressed the quality control issues which were present with the aftermarket BLTouch.

Now, to make things easier for any of you who may wish to try it out for yourselves, I’m making both the files and the firmware available for download on my ThingIverse Page. So would I say that the CR Touch and Hot End Upgrade was worth it in the end. I would say that yes, depending on how you intend to use this machine. I’m personally swapping out materials fairly constantly, so not having to worry about the bed levelling because of the temperatures changes makes the CR Touch Worth it in my case. As for the hot end upgrade, well that depends on the materials you intend to use. I do want to use some of my higher temperature materials, and I’ve been unable to utilize because of the limitations of the hot end, so once again in my case this does become relevant.

Also, for those of you who actually want to use this video as a guide, keep in mind that I will be posting the transcript on my main website to make it easier to follow along. Alternatively, please feel free to slow down the video by hitting the gear icon on the bottom right-hand corner of your screen and to changing the speed settings.

If you want to support this channel, please feel free to check out some merch on my website. Thank you for watching, and I hope to see you guys soon. Thank you and take care.

Nozzle Change – CR10 V3 3D Printer





Transcript

Hello everybody and welcome to another video tutorial. Today we’ll be addressing the question that some of you had in the past as to how to change the nozzle on the CR10 V3 since the housing is very tight and difficult to disassemble. Well the good news is that you can do this pretty much as easily as any other machine if you know what to look out for in the process. As always, I am in no way responsible for any damages that may occur so do this at you’re own risk.

Before we even begin removing the existing nozzle we first need to clean out the hot end and there’s a very simply method that I prefer to use for this. The main method I use now days is commonly known as a “Cold pull”. Not only is this great for cleaning out your nozzle if it’s jamming, but it’s also great for clearing out the passageway when doing a nozzle change.

Although I do prefer to use some TPU while doing this, PLA will also work, but you’ll just have to be careful not to snap it in the process. To start things off, if you don’t have any filament already loading into your machine you’ll need to preheat the nozzle by going to “Prepare” + “Preheat PLA” and “Preheat PLA End”. Both PLA and TPU will both use the same temperature settings in this case. Now with TPU you have the option of tying the end into a knot which will make it easier to remove later on, so we’ll cut a piece off that’ll be long enough to feed through and feed it into the hot end. Just make sure that it’s a little longer so that it extrudes slightly. Remove the part that extruded from the hot end and begin cooling down the machine by going to “Prepare” + “Cooldown”. The hot end should be at its normal room temperature before continuing to the next step. Once it’s Cooldown completely you’ll restart the heating process while tugging on the filament at the same time. As the hot end heats up any residue will be dislodged when the filament is pulled out at a low temperature. As you can see I did this process with both TPU and PLA with the same results. Once again just make sure not to snap the filament while doing this step.

For the following steps here’s what I recommend you pick up for the nozzle change. While some of these are optional most are highly recommended. A ratchet with extender and bits, needle nose vice grips, magnetic tray, pipe joint tape and your replacement nozzle.

With the nozzle cleaned up we can now begin swapping the end so to do this will need some needle nose vice grips. Normally for most machines you don’t need this specific tool however because of how close the hot end assembly is to the components and the difficulty which can be experience in removing the outer shell I do highly recommend you pick this up. A small ratcheting socket set is also helpful however there are more specialized tools out there, so this one isn’t as necessary. You’ll want to take a close look underneath to check where the wiring is mainly located since the last thing we want to do is damage the thermistor or heater cartridge. To do this we’ll raise the hot end assembly up the Z axis by going through the menu system. Go to “Prepare” + “Move Axis” + “Move Z” and we’ll set the number high enough to easily access the hot end with our tools. As an extra precaution I would also recommend putting something on the glass bed just in case you drop a tool on the surface.

Anything after this point should be done with a minimum of one glove on your hand to keep from burning yourself. With your vice grips you’ll lock this onto the heater block while making sure to avoid any of the delicate wiring that’s on the inside. Luckily the design of the hot end assembly automatically places these components into an area where they’re less likely to get damaged. Here’s a picture of how this looks under my machine but double check just in case before clamping the vice grips in place. The nice thing about using a ratchet which has an extender on it is that the extender helps to defuse the heat far easier and prevents burning. So you’ll unscrew the nozzle carefully and remove it from the hot end assembly.

Before we begin putting on the replacement, we first want to add some pipe joint tape since this’ll help produce a greater seal within the threads and prevent material from oozing out. I personally prefer using the version which is thicker since it requires less wrapping, but that’ll depend on your preferences. This material can be found at any local hardware store or online depending on what’s more convenient. A very important note is to make sure that the hole isn’t in any way covered or that you get this material inside. This can cause some very bad nozzle jams so take care of this step. If it’s covered, simply use your tweezers to punch a small hole and roll the material around the edge of the thread. Now we simply screw back in the nozzle making sure to have it just tight enough to hold into place. Just as you’re getting close to finish tightening the hot end, you’ll hold onto the vice grips and tighten the hot end followed by slightly turning the vice grips to allow for a greater seal. DO NOT under any circumstances do not overtighten the nozzle since it can snap in the heater block. Simply remove the vice grips, and you’re ready to go.

Also, for those of you who actually want to use this video as guide keep in mind that I will be posting the transcript on my main website to make it easier to follow along. Alternatively please feel free to slow down the video by hitting the gear icon on the bottom right-hand corner of your screen and to change the speed settings.

CR10-V3 Unboxing Impressions



In this video I will be unboxing the CR10-V3 3D printer by Creality to see just how easy it was get up and running.  I will also give some tips and tricks on the assembly to make it easier for other's to do as well.  I purchased this video for my production process since it's a direct extruder design and is more suitable for flexible filaments.  The build format is also quite a bit larger than my existing machines which is why I found this to be a suitable addition to my prototyping studio.  I will be doing a full review of the machine in the future so please keep an eye for this.

Transcript

 Hello everybody and welcome to another video. In today’s video I will be taking a first look at a new 3D printer which I haven’t as of yet heard much about. I am planning on making a follow up which will be the full review however today I’ll go over the assembly and first impressions that I have with the machine. I bought this machine online soon after it was available and have been taking a closer look at it’s capabilities. This video was in no way sponsored, I purchased this machine in order to fit the requirements for some of my client work and decided on this model.

  The packaging was extremely well done which was a relief given the shipping company which was used to deliver my printer. One thing that is important to note is that the support bars are hidden in a compartment in the foam so you’ll want to make sure to find those pieces otherwise you won’t benefit from the rigid frame design. If you pick up the foam pieces you’ll notice that one is heavier than the other’s and this is where the compartment is located.

  Once opened, you should have all the materials that you need to assemble this machine however at the time of this recording the BLT touch was back-order therefore I will be including this in the follow up video instead. The user manual is very well designed with a parts breakdown list and diagram in color which is always a good sign. The company has also been very good in providing instructional tutorial within their website in order to help with problem solving.

  Before you begin assembly always take all of the components and place them out so that you can make sure you have all of the required parts. This is simple but important step before you begin working on putting any machine together. Lay the frame on top after you’ve turned the couplings upwards to give yourself some more room. When attaching the main bolts for the frame, I would recommend moving the machine to the side of the table so that you can see underneath without damaging any of the components. I loosely tighten these screws until I have them all placed at which point I tighten them fully. If you over tighten then you could risk bending or stripping the threads so they should be tight enough that they won’t come lose but not so tight that you see your tool bending with the force.

  For the pull rod, you’ll first need to join two of the poles together using the provided double ended screw. You’ll want to partially turn in one portion of the component. For the second bar you’ll want to hold it with you thumb to prevent it from spinning while you attach the second pole. You’ll then attach the live bolt to either ends of the joined pole. Make sure to add the bolt onto the live bolt since this will help lock the bar into place. In my initial assembly I overlooked this portion and had to fix this latter on. Make sure to use the Wrench to tighten the bolt afterwards. Take one of the screws and place this through the live bolt hole while placing the washer on the other opposing side. Screw this first into the bottom hole. In my case this hole was covered with plastic caps to help protect them so you’ll need to remove these before completing the assembly.

  Next I pre-threaded the L connector for the top of the frame making sure to keep these a lose as possible. These turn around in the grove to lock themselves into place if put in correctly. Double check to make sure that they’re turned the right way after you’ve put these into place. I then attached the Live bolt into the frame in the same manner as the bottom of the rod.

  Z end stop goes on the side where the two screw holes are and with the switch facing upwards. The company also provide a replacement switch in case it’s needed in the future so make sure that you store this in a safe location.

  I made sure to change the correct input voltage to my areas requirements which for me is 115.

  The next part was to attach the filament run out detector. This portion has an arrow so that you know the proper orientation for this part. I mounted it with the arrow facing to the front so that the light is visible when turned on. As the for the filament spool, I mounted it differently from what was shown in the diagram. From personal experience I’ve had some spool which could get caught on edges so choose the smoother side as the contact area. The filament run out sensor seems to have quite a bit of friction and may cause issues during printing. I made sure to mount it as close as possible while still having enough room for a full sized spool of filament. If this is your first printer and you don’t have a full spool keep in mind you will need to adjust this latter since the provided one is extremely small in comparison.

  With the basic assembly completed, I then connected the power cable and build plate connector to the power box. Following the labeling of the cables, I connected the two Z axis connector and the Z stop sensor. Afterwards I proceed to connect the Y axis motor, XE Transfer Interface, YZ Transfer Interface, filament run out sensor, Extruder Motor and the cable guide by following the instructions and labels provided. When I received my shipment the cable guide was attached to the frame however this came off during the unboxing so make sure to check carefully to ensure that it’s installed before finishing. Also it’s very important to give the cable enough slack in order to move completely to the back to prevent any undo strain. This guide is important in preventing the premature wear of the cables which is a common issue with printers.

  With the machine put together I it was now time to print the model that was provided with the printer. It’s always a good idea to print the test model before doing anything else since this can help diagnose issues more quickly. In my case the print came out almost flawless however because of the choice of filament it was difficult to see the imperfections along the surface. Once this print was completed, I then swapped out the nozzle to check how it printed with a larger nozzle size. I must point out that changing the nozzle is somewhat awkward if you don’t know how to do it properly. This is something which I will discuss in the full review of the machine afterwards. With the nozzle changed out, I then began tweaking my settings until I had something which worked fairly well. I’ll be doing quite a bit more tweaks before I finish this piece off but for now this is how the print came out.